Chesterfield House
Basement re-use and extension, minimised transfer structure
Hub Group’s Chesterfield House PRS development occupies a brownfield site adjacent to a mainline railway in Wembley, north London. Its three-part high rise structure incorporates the partial re-use and extension of an existing basement.

The concrete frame complex consists of a 26-level South Tower, a 21-level North Tower and an eight-level mid section, together accommodating 239 private rental scheme (PRS) residential units. Two main cores provide stability, and commercial space, plant and bicycle storage are housed in the single-level basement; further commercial space and plant are at ground level.

One of the significant engineering challenges was the foundation and basement design. Structural drawings were not available for the previous structure, so it was not known what scale of obstructions could be expected in the ground that would need accommodating in the design. The existing basement walls were therefore propped and the floor slab removed — revealing no previous piling. The new basement is shallower than the existing one, which has been extended to the rear. The development is founded on 600mm diameter bored piles.

The brick-clad towers step back twice in plan as they rise, providing space for roof terraces. Transfer structure has been limited to the first and second floors to minimise increases in floors depths that would reduce ceiling heights in the residential zones.

Whitby Wood provided civil, geotechnical, asset protection and structural engineering services for the project, including gaining technical approvals from Network Rail for construction of the development up to the site/Network Rail boundary and the basement extension works.

location
Wembley, London, UK
client
Hub Group
architect
MaccreanorLavington
completion
2019

services

Structural engineering
Geotechnical engineering
Civil engineering
Asset protection

sectors

Residential
High-rise structure

model : Whitby Wood
rendering : MaccreanorLavington
site photo : courtesy Henry Construction